roden public school toronto history - UniversityEssaydatesCom

roden public school toronto history

By | 19.08.2018

Toronto Guardian

Recent News

  • [ August 18, 2018 ]


    “A Day in the Life” with Toronto fashion designer NARCES


    Artist Profiles


  • [ August 18, 2018 ]


    Buffy the cat is looking for a new family in the Toronto area


    Lifestyle


  • [ August 17, 2018 ]


    “Five Minutes With” Toronto Hip Hop artist Marcus Haran


    Hip Hop


  • [ August 16, 2018 ]


    Vintage photographs from the first years of the Toronto Zoo


    History


  • [ August 16, 2018 ]


    A sneak peek at some of Weslodge restaurant’s new menu items


    Food & Drink

Vintage Photographs of School Students in Toronto

August 25, 2016
Joel Levy
History , The City

Labour Day is upon us and that means back to school for children, teens and young adults. To celebrate back to school and the end of the summer, I put together a vintage gallery of School Students in Toronto from 1900 – 1950.

Check out the gallery and be sure to share it with friends. Enjoy!

1873 - Islington Public School
1873 – Islington Public School
1900s - Agincourt Public School opening ceremonies, Agincourt, Scarborough Twp
1900s – Agincourt Public School opening ceremonies, Agincourt, Scarborough Twp
1908 - Artists' class in old swimming pool
1908 – Artists’ class in old swimming pool
1908 - Chemistry class, Technical School
1908 – Chemistry class, Technical School
1911 - Life drawing class, Ontario School of Art, The Grange
1911 – Life drawing class, Ontario School of Art, The Grange
1913 - Forest School - Board of Education
1913 – Forest School – Board of Education
1913 - Forest School - Board of Education - High Park 2
1913 – Forest School – Board of Education – High Park 2
1913 - Forest School - Board of Education - High Park copy
1913 – Forest School – Board of Education – High Park copy
1913 - Forest School - Board of Education - High Park copy 2
1913 – Forest School – Board of Education – High Park copy 2
1913 - Forest School - Board of Education High Park
1913 – Forest School – Board of Education High Park
1913 - Forest School - Children playing with plasticine
1913 – Forest School – Children playing with plasticine
1913 - High Park - Forest School. polishing teeth
1913 – High Park – Forest School. polishing teeth
1917 - Forest School - waking up and making beds
1917 – Forest School – waking up and making beds
1917 - Gardening at Hillcrest Public School
1917 – Gardening at Hillcrest Public School
1919 - Forest School, High Park
1919 – Forest School, High Park
1919 - Junior Health League — Niagara Street School
1919 – Junior Health League — Niagara Street School
1919 - Orde Street Open Air School
1919 – Orde Street Open Air School
1919 - Orde Street Open Air School 2
1919 – Orde Street Open Air School 2
1919 - Roden School, 310 Ashdale Avenue — playground
1919 – Roden School, 310 Ashdale Avenue — playground
1919 - St. Helen's Separate School — Little Mothers Class
1919 – St. Helen’s Separate School — Little Mothers Class
1921 - Orde Street School pupil
1921 – Orde Street School pupil
Central Technical School, view of cooking class. - July 11, 1923
Central Technical School, view of cooking class. – July 11, 1923
1923 - Children at Connaught School
1923 – Children at Connaught School
1923 - Children at Connaught School drinking milk
1923 – Children at Connaught School drinking milk
1923 - Class room inspection. Public School
1923 – Class room inspection. Public School
1923 - Domestic Science class at Earl Grey School - students using specially designed gas burners to learn cooking skills
1923 – Domestic Science class at Earl Grey School – students using specially designed gas burners to learn cooking skills
1923 - Milk program, Manning Avenue School
1923 – Milk program, Manning Avenue School
1923 - Orde Street School — sight saving adjustable desk
1923 – Orde Street School — sight saving adjustable desk
1923 - Orde Street School — sight saving adjustable desk copy
1923 – Orde Street School — sight saving adjustable desk copy
1924 - New Jarvis Collegiate, pupils entering school
1924 – New Jarvis Collegiate, pupils entering school
1925 - Hughes School choir group
1925 – Hughes School choir group
1925 - Normal School, children leaving for holidays
1925 – Normal School, children leaving for holidays
1926 - Adam Beck School cornerstone, group of children
1926 – Adam Beck School cornerstone, group of children
1926 - Aurora, group of school children
1926 – Aurora, group of school children
1926 - Daily transportation of school children, Separate School Board
1926 – Daily transportation of school children, Separate School Board
1926 - High Park Forest School class at work, girl writing
1926 – High Park Forest School class at work, girl writing
1926 - Normal School, kindergarton May Pole group
1926 – Normal School, kindergarton May Pole group
1926 - Riverdale Park Zoo — Sackville School children
1926 – Riverdale Park Zoo — Sackville School children
1926 - Victoria Park Forest School, child eating ice-cream cone
1926 – Victoria Park Forest School, child eating ice-cream cone
1926 - Victoria Park Forest School, serving milk to children
1926 – Victoria Park Forest School, serving milk to children
1928 - Davisville School, costume group
1928 – Davisville School, costume group
1928 - High Park Forest School
1928 – High Park Forest School
1929 - Appleby School games, start, junior 1/2 mile
1929 – Appleby School games, start, junior 1/2 mile
1929 - Fire-drill, Queen Alexandra School, Broadview Avenue
1929 – Fire-drill, Queen Alexandra School, Broadview Avenue
1929 - Normal School Caravan, boys scramble for kits
1929 – Normal School Caravan, boys scramble for kits
1929 - Normal School Caravan, smallest boy with bucket
1929 – Normal School Caravan, smallest boy with bucket
1929 - Separate School pageant, Arena, group of 7
1929 – Separate School pageant, Arena, group of 7
1930 - Fern Avenue pre-school clinic group, interior
1930 – Fern Avenue pre-school clinic group, interior
1930 - Junior Vocational School, pyramid by gym class
1930 – Junior Vocational School, pyramid by gym class
1930 - Junior Vocational School, tailor shop
1930 – Junior Vocational School, tailor shop
1930 - Junior Vocational School, tumbling, 2 boys
1930 – Junior Vocational School, tumbling, 2 boys
1930 - Normal School games, hurdle race, under 15
1930 – Normal School games, hurdle race, under 15
1930 - Normal School games, obstacle race
1930 – Normal School games, obstacle race
1930 - Normal School, boys with bird houses
1930 – Normal School, boys with bird houses
1930 - Western Technical School, Batik work
1930 – Western Technical School, Batik work
1930 - Western Technical School, boys working on aviation motor
1930 – Western Technical School, boys working on aviation motor
1931 - Runnymede School, boys playing leap-frog
1931 – Runnymede School, boys playing leap-frog
1931 - Runnymede School, boys playing marbles
1931 – Runnymede School, boys playing marbles
1931 - Runnymede School, girls playing jacks
1931 – Runnymede School, girls playing jacks
1931 - Runnymede School, girls skipping
1931 – Runnymede School, girls skipping
1934 - Health Sercive — Oriole Park School
1934 – Health Sercive — Oriole Park School
1935 - 1945 - Mimico school band
1935 – 1945 – Mimico school band
1936 - Dental clinic, Brown School
1936 – Dental clinic, Brown School
1940 - Music Class. Unidentified school
1940 – Music Class. Unidentified school
1942 - Inoculations for High School Students in gymnasium of High School
1942 – Inoculations for High School Students in gymnasium of High School
1942 - Public Health Dept. Inoculations in gymnasium of a high school
1942 – Public Health Dept. Inoculations in gymnasium of a high school
1942 - Wilkinson Open Air School. Children sleeping on cots copy
1942 – Wilkinson Open Air School. Children sleeping on cots copy
1942 - Wilkinson Open Air School. Classroom with seated children
1942 – Wilkinson Open Air School. Classroom with seated children
1947 - N.D. School & Medical Services for children
1947 – N.D. School & Medical Services for children
1952 - St. Mary's School traffic patrol
1952 – St. Mary’s School traffic patrol

 

Check out the Toronto Archives for more vintage photos of School Students in Toronto.

 

 

  • children
  • Old photographs
  • school
  • vintage
Joel Levy

About Joel Levy

1248 Articles

Editor-In-Chief at Toronto Guardian.

Photographer and Writer for Toronto Guardian and Joel Levy Photography


Contact:


Website


Twitter

Related Articles

Vintage Queen Street Photographs from Toronto (Part 2)

July 20, 2017
1925 - H. Armstrong Roberts - Nipigon Men cooking copy 3

Vintage Ontario Photographs of Summer Camps and Camping

August 9, 2018
Canadian Pacific

A Historical Look at Canadian Pacific Through Design

January 30, 2016

Advertisement

Follow us on Facebook

Most Recent Posts

  • quick lunch at the food truck

    “A Day in the Life” with Toronto fashion designer NARCES

    August 18, 2018
  • Buffy the cat

    Buffy the cat is looking for a new family in the Toronto area

    August 18, 2018
  • Marcus Haran

    “Five Minutes With” Toronto Hip Hop artist Marcus Haran

    August 17, 2018
  • Vintage photographs from the first years of the Toronto Zoo

    August 16, 2018
  • Weslodge Menu

    A sneak peek at some of Weslodge restaurant’s new menu items

    August 16, 2018

POST EVENTS

Post your event on the Toronto Guardian Events Page with this link.

  

Newsletter Signup

Advertisement

Copyright © 2018 | Toronto Guardian

Leslieville Historical Society

Menu

Search

Close Menu

Filter Contents

Close Contents

Years

  • 2018
  • 2017
  • 2016
  • 2014

Authors

  • Joanne Doucette
  • StackSquirrel

Filter by Month

  • May 2018
  • April 2018
  • March 2018
  • February 2018
  • January 2018
  • December 2017
  • November 2017
  • October 2017
  • September 2017
  • May 2017
  • March 2017
  • February 2017
  • January 2017
  • December 2016
  • November 2016
  • October 2016
  • September 2016
  • June 2016
  • May 2016
  • April 2016
  • February 2016
  • May 2014

Filter by Categories

  • General History
  • Streets
  • Walking tour

Filter by Tags

Anderson Ruffin Abbott / Ashbridge / Ashbridges / Ashdale Avenue / Binford / Black history / Black Jack / Brickmaking / Bridgwater / Carlaw / Charles Coxwell Small / Coxwell Gerrard maps / Coxwell history / Craven Road / Dockerty / East End Toronto / Edward Henry Duggan / Elgin Association / Erie Terrace / George Leslie / Gerrard history / Glenside / Granison Price / Greenwood Avenue / Harriet Beecher Stowe / Hiawatha Avenue / Isaac Price / Isaac Price House / John Price / Joseph Simpson / Leslie / Leslieville / Lewis Doherty / local history Toronto / Luella Price / Red Legs / Redwood Avenue / Reid Avenue / Rhodes Avenue / Riverdale Gardens / Smalls Pond / Toronto history / Uncle Tom’s Cabin / Underground railroad / Woodfield Road

Morse Street Public School

Photograph by Julia Patterson

Photograph by Julia Patterson

A SHORT HISTORY OF THE EARLY DAYS OF MORSE STREET PUBLIC SCHOOL

On September 17, 1873: The Toronto Public School Board began search for a school site “at or near Leslieville” for inhabitants in eastern portion of St. Lawrence ward living south of Queen Street (then known as Kingston Road).

From the Globe July 8 1881. School Section #6 was in the Township of York (north of Queen). The Willow Street School was in the City of Toronto, south of Queen Street.

From the Globe July 8 1881. School Section #6 was in the Township of York (north of Queen). The Willow Street School was in the City of Toronto, south of Queen Street.

On Feb 18, 1874 they selected a site “west of Messrs. Leslie and Sons Nursery” on the north east corner of Eastern and Pape. The two-room school was first called South Park Street School, but was soon officially named Leslieville School. The school was also sometimes referred to as Willow Street School. Pape Avenue was known as “Willow Street” because a huge willow tree grew at the corner of Queen and Pape. (Basketmakers lived on Willow Street, using the thin branches or osiers to weave their wares.) The Willow Street School was in the City of Toronto, not the Township of York. What is today known as the Leslieville Public School on Leslie Street was not the same school and not under the City of Toronto School Board. The Leslie Street School was under the York School Board until 1884 when Leslieville was amalgamated with the City of Toronto. Confusing now and probably confusing then I think.

Publisher of The Toronto Telegram, John Ross Robertson wrote: “Morse street is named after George D. Morse, a cattle dealer, who was drowned in the Don.” [1] “A new street, to run from the Kingston road to Eastern Avenue, is contemplated. It will start nearly opposite Logan’s line, and will be called Morse street.” [2] But the first house wasn’t built until a few years later. “The first house is now being erected on Morse-street, an avenue only recently opened.” [3]

In 1884 when Leslieville north of Queen Street was annexed by City of Toronto, some street names changed to avoid duplication with streets in the old City of Toronto. On Feb 7, 1884 the City of Toronto’s Leslieville School had its name changed to the Eastern Avenue School—presumably to avoid confusion with the Leslie Street School. That school had been under the York Township Board but now fell under the Toronto School Board. A Morse Street site was purchased for a four-room school to replace the Eastern Avenue School. In 1885 the Eastern Avenue School and site sold by public auction.  Richard Cunningham Windeyer (1831-1900), was chosen as architect. [4]

.”…the site in question was a part of a swamp, and that if the school were erected there it would need a cast-iron cellar,” said a trustee.” [5]

By John Willson, 1900.

By John Willson, 1900.

None of the Tenders Acceptable.

Contractors’ figures too high. 

The Building and Sites Committee of the Public School Board met yesterday afternoon, when the tenders for the erection of a new school on Morse-street, St. Lawrence Ward, were opened. While the tenders were being examined, some remarks were passed by one of the members about the site chosen for the new school.  Mr. Metcalfe accused Mr. Roden, the chairman, of having falsely stated that the site in question was a part of a swamp, and that if the school were erected there it would need a cast-iron cellar. The chairman, he said, had told a falsehood about the site. It was a very suitable one, and he did not see why any obstacle should be thrown in the way of erecting a school there. While St. Lawrence Ward paid as much taxes as any ward in the city it had the worst school accommodation. When the Rose-avenue School was being built the present Chairman had not thrown any obstacle in the way of that work, because he was interested in that section. Mr. Roden said he had not said anything against the site for the Morse-street School. Mr. Metcalfe said he had not got the Chairman’s support in the matter, and he did not care to have it. Mr. Roden said if Mr. Metcalfe was going to get mad about it, perhaps he would not be able to get the matter passed through the Committee. Addressing the other members of the Committee he said the appropriation for this school was $6,000, and as a third of that amount had already been expended in the site, he did not know if they could recommend the erection of the new school in the St. Lawrence Ward, as they would not have sufficient money left.

THE TENDERS TOO HIGH.

It was found that the lowest of the different tenders for plumbing, carpentering, glazing, etc., amounted altogether to $9,700. The Committee decided that this was more than they could afford to spend for the Morse-street school. The plans were accordingly handed to Mr. Windeyer, the architect, whose was instructed to make some alterations in them that would lessen the cost of the building. There were over twenty tenders for the work.” [6]

In December 1885 the new school opened. In 1886 Morse Street School listed for the first time by the Board of Education with 222 pupils enrolled. In 1889 there was the first addition to Morse Street School.

In 1890s, Leslieville grew rapidly.  All the schools were overcrowded.  Two temporary school rooms opened: at St. Clements’ Anglican and Queen St E Presbyterian. Older students had to walk to the Leslie Street School even from as far north as west of Pape all the way up to Danforth Ave.  This was too far for the smallest children to walk.

“The residents of the East End who live west of Pape avenue are up in arms over the proposed change in the removal of the kindergarten scholars from Carlaw avenue to Leslie street school.  At present all the children who are attending the kindergarten school live west of Pape avenue, which would make an additional walk of about three-quarters of a mile to a mile and a half.” [7]

Four new rooms in Leslie street school opened.  The school now had eight rooms and was full. 82 students moved from the Morse street school to the Leslie street school. “This school is now one of the best in the city, having all the modern improvements and conveniences.” [8]

It had, at that time, 253 students. There was an average of 50 students a room, a student-teacher ratio that would be unthinkable today. The limits of Leslie street school have been extended west, including both sides of Pape avenue.  This was done in order to close the temporary rooms at St. Clement’s church and the Presbyterian church. There were now 395 students at the Leslie street school.  Nearly 50 would-be students could not go to school because of lack of space.  Older students had to walk to the Leslie Street School even from as far north as west of Pape all the way up to Danforth Avenue. [9]

Attendance continued to increase.  More children were going to Leslie Street School, Morse Street School – Leslieville schools, but also schools across the City. “East of the Don” had some of the most crowded schools in Toronto. The schools in this area were:  Leslie, 404 students, seven rooms; Morse, 519 students, eight rooms. [10]

But going to school was exciting for many.

“The cantata entitled “Queen Winter and Jack Frost,” rendered by the pupils of Morse street school, under the direction of Miss E. Williams, the principal, last night in Dingman’s hall, was a decided success in every way. The hall was well filled with the friends and parents of the children, who showed that they were delighted with the way all performed their several parts by heartily applauding every act.

The Masters Jordan rendered valuable assistance as accompanist and cornetist respectively. Messrs. H. Gilby, G.T. Pendrith and J.C. Clarke took the part of the Shepherds, and Mr. Pendrith the part of the Storm King in a very satisfactory manner. Everything passed off without a hitch and the enjoyable entertainment was brought to a close about 10 o’clock by the singing of the National Anthem.

Inspector Chapman was present and made a short complimentary speech to the children.  Ex-school Trustee A.E. Hagerman took the part of the Master in good style.” [11]

“The junior pupils of Morse street school gave a pleasing cantata entitled “Queen revel,” under the direction of the principal. Miss Williams, in Dingman’s hall, Friday night. The audience, which was a good one, were delighted with the entertainment. Trustee Fitzgerald presided and gave a short address. Ex-Trustee A.E. Hagerman, who still takes a deep interest in school affairs, was also present and gave a happy congratulatory speech.” [12]

“The sub-committee of the School Board on School Limits met at Morse school yesterday afternoon to investigate the over-crowding in that district and to see what can be done to remedy the difficulty. There are only eight rooms in the school and they are all over-crowded, except the senior fourth, and there are over 70 children in the district who cannot be admitted through lack of room. The Bolton avenue school, too, although four new rooms have been added, is greatly over-crowded, as many as 82 scholars being in one room.” [13]

Morse Street Playground — Festival August 28, 1915 City of Toronto Archives

Morse Street Playground — Festival
August 28, 1915 City of Toronto Archives

Morse Street Playground — Festival August 28, 1915 City of Toronto Archives

Morse Street Playground — Festival
August 28, 1915 City of Toronto Archives

In 1895 there was another addition to the Morse Street Public School. Attendance continued to increase.  In 1896 the kindergarten class at the Morse Street School had over 90 children. [14]

”The Morse street school has an overflow class-room in the Sunday schoolroom at Queen street and Carlaw avenue. There is no school accommodation between here and Kew Beach, a distance of two and a half miles.

At Kew Beach they want a two-room school and site. At present there are two junior classes in the school-room and chapel of the Kenilworth avenue Baptist church. The rooms are full of bewildering cross-lights from stained-glass windows. The dim religious light is not good for school purposes. The windows are on the casement plan and must be opened the whole length or not at all.

Is it worthwhile to spend $100,000 in removing the little tots from their daily graves and torture-chambers? Is it good policy to have their eyes and their lungs sound? The school children of Toronto have contributed nobly to a sick children’s hospital. Will the city Council endorse an expenditure which will take 1,473 from ’surroundings’ that may eventually send them to the place where their pennies went?” [15]

 “MORE SCHOOLS, SITES WANTED

Chairman Starr says the Board Must Make a Determined Stand—Children Must not be Crowded into Basements. 

Chairman Starr, of the Public School Board, announced at the Management Committee yesterday afternoon his policy of a vigorous effort to procure proper school accommodation to meet the demands of the growing population. “I am quite prepared,” said Mr. Starr, “to take my share of the responsibility for recommending the purchase of sites for new schools where they are needed. I am not willing that children should be crowded into basements and sheds for lack of proper accommodation. Neither do I believe we should build our existing schools three or four storeys high. It is not desirable that children should have to climb to upper storeys.”

FOR THE EAST END.

The committee decided that to relieve Bolton, Morse and Hamilton schools two rooms at Pape avenue be finished, and that seven new rooms be built at Bolton avenue, Morse and Hamilton streets.” [16]

In 1898 some Toronto School Board trustees fought tenaciously to have Miss Williams, the principal of Morse Street School removed — because she was a woman! They did not succeed. The Toronto Star article of October 21, 1898, sums up the arguments and reflects both the misogyny of the period and the changing attitudes towards women.

Women get a chance

Morse Street Playground FestivalAugust 19, 1916 From the City of Toronto Archives

Morse Street Playground FestivalAugust 19, 1916
From the City of Toronto Archives

In 1909 there was another addition Morse Street Public School and in 1914 another. In 1931 there was another addition built.  The school grew to 17 classrooms, three kindergartens, a staff room, offices and a health room.

Empire Day parade, Morse Street School flower party. - May 23, 1929

Empire Day parade, Morse Street School flower party. May 23, 1929. From the City of toronto Archives.

In 1971 the new Morse Street school that we have today formally opened.

In 1999 the Morse Street Junior Public School 180 Carlaw Avenue celebrated 125 years serving the community.

 

[1] John Ross Robertson, Landmarks of Toronto, Vol. 1, 523.

[2] The Toronto Daily Mail, May 13, 1881

[3] Globe July 24 1883

[4] http://www.dictionaryofarchitectsincanada.org/architects/view/1287 and also see The Annual Report of the Inspector of Public Schools of the City of Toronto for 1885, Appendix, 3

[5] Globe, March 17, 1885

[6] Toronto Star, January 27, 1894

[7] Toronto Star, April 16, 1894

[8] Toronto Star Tuesday, May 1, 1894

[9] Toronto Star, May 1, 1894

[10] Toronto Star, October 2, 1894, Toronto Star, October 4, 1894

[11] Toronto Star, January 27, 1894

[12] Toronto Star, March 19, 1894

[13] Toronto Star, October 2, 1894

[14] Toronto Star September 2, 1896

[15] Toronto Star, February 10, 1898

[16] Toronto Star, January 24, 1900

Share this:

  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google

Recent Posts

  • SUNLIGHT SOAP WORKS: NEW PLANT 1901
    May 13, 2018
  • Action on Heritage properties Leslieville
    May 3, 2018
  • Carlaw Plaques info
    April 30, 2018
  • East End Maps
    April 6, 2018
  • The Linking of Montreal and Toronto
    March 8, 2018

Archives

  • May 2018
  • April 2018
  • March 2018
  • February 2018
  • January 2018
  • December 2017
  • November 2017
  • October 2017
  • September 2017
  • May 2017
  • March 2017
  • February 2017
  • January 2017
  • December 2016
  • November 2016
  • October 2016
  • September 2016
  • June 2016
  • May 2016
  • April 2016
  • February 2016
  • May 2014

Meta

  • Register
  • Log in
  • Entries RSS
  • Comments RSS
  • WordPress.com

Follow Leslieville Historical Society on WordPress.com

%d bloggers like this:

Iconic One Theme | Powered by Wordpress